Seriously predictable interface names – An introduction to systemd .link files

Predictable interface names are a new thing. The most common argument made is that they are not really predictable though, depending on the point of view. How about making interface names predictable and meaningful in the same time?

Most admins will probably think of udev right now, which previously was heavily used to achieve exactly that. In times of systemd the new hotness are .link files which provide similar capabilities and allow even more options to be set for interfaces.

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Anycasted services with Debian, bird, anycast-healthchecker and Cisco Nexus 7000

A while ago we started getting alerts, that one of our Kerberos KDCs had problem with the Kerberos database replication. A little digging revealed, that the problems are caused by load spikes on the KDC which were the result of a burst of legitimate queries fired by some systems we didn’t have much control over. Additionally we found that the MIT Kerberos implementation queries all KDCs provided in the configuration file in sequential order, so the first KDC get’s nearly all queries. While thinking about load balancing solutions, quickly anycast came to mind, so we decided to set it up. Anycast leverages the Equal Cost Multipath Routing (ECMP)  capability of common routers to distribute traffic to multiple next-hops for the same destination.

The solution consists of three corner stones:

  1. anycast-healtchecker as a means to check service availability
  2. bird as a BGP speaker on the KDCs and route reflectors
  3. Data center routers (Cisco Nexus 7010) speaking BGP to the route reflectors

The topology is as follows:

Topology KDCs

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Building your own Software Defined Network with Linux and Open Source Tools

Nearly two years ago, I started thinking about a next generation design for the Freifunk Hochstift backbone infrastructure, motivated by the limits and design choices made before (we were young and didn’t know better.. or didn’t listen..).

This post is the starting point of a series of posts about building a software defined wireless ISP network with Linux, a fistful of Open Source tools and low cost hardware.

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